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How to Guide

How to Guide

Part 5: Pinterest as a Search Engine

This is the final post on my 5 part series on Pinterest 

1. Getting Started with Pinterest

2. Pinning with Pinterest

3. Pinterest on The World Wide Web

4. Your Pinterest Boards and Community

5. Pinterest as a Search Engine

I find that more and more I am turning to Pinterest as my search engine; be it for recipes, fashion, travel ideas, or books to read; everything I need as right there on Pinterest.

In the top left hand corner is the search bar and there really isn’t any limitation on your search as the Pinterest community is far and wide and individual and covering anything you could pretty much think of. Not every search is going to reveal the exact thing you are looking for but 9 times out of 10, you are going to come pretty close OR be put on search train that will get you there in the end.

For example, recently I was creating a look in Polyvore and wanted to feature glitter as the main event in my set – I wasn’t entirely sure in which way glitter would feature but knew it was a fashion trend I wanted to try. I headed to Pinterest, typed “glitter” in the search bar and was given pages and pages of different pins featuring glitter. Instant inspiration.

  



Other than fashion, the next biggest inspiration I take from Pinterest is food and entertaining ideas. The amount of recipes I have taken from this site is endless. I no longer Google search for ideas for dinner or baking or treats, I head straight to Pinterest and type in what I am looking for – fondue was my most recent search after a trip to Chamonix.

Or if I’m not sure what I feel like, I will just limit my search (through the drop down options when you hover over the EVERYTHING tab) to the Food and Drink section, and browse through the recent pins from the Pinterest community. The best thing about this is not only do you get visual inspiration, but most times, the pin will lead you to a website where the recipe will be waiting for you!

When you hover over “EVERYTHING” at the top of the tool bar, you will be given a drop down menu where there are 33 different Pin categories, ranging from DIY to GEEK, so no matter what your search, you should just about be covered.

 

How to Guide

Part 4: Your Pinterest Boards & Community

This is the fourth post on my 5 part series on Pinterest 

1. Getting Started with Pinterest

2. Pinning with Pinterest

3. Pinterest on The World Wide Web

4. Your Pinterest Boards and Community

5. Pinterest as a Search Engine

Now that you are used to pinning images from within Pinterest and from your travels around the internet, you will find that you are ready to tidy up your boards a little and to broaden your Pinterest community; making pinning and searching easier.

When I first started my Pinterest affair, I had about 5 boards with a LOT of different pins on each board. Once I cleaned these up a little I found that my boards were nicer to view and that pinning became a little easier.

To add to your boards or to rearrange the pins on your boards, at the top of the screen in the right hand corner, under your Pinterest profile name, you will see a drop down menu and from there your BOARDS page.

From this page, you can rearrange the order of your boards, create or delete boards and reorganise your pins. You can also see a newsfeed of your recent activity (on the left hand side of the page) and the top of your page you can also see how many pins you have, how many boards you have and how many likes you have given. This is the go-to page for your Pinterest activity.

In order to rearrange your boards, simply click the “rearrange boards” button at the top of the page and drag and drop until you are happy. Unfortunately, rearranging your pins isn’t as easy – if you have a pin that you would like to move to another board – say for example you have split a “fashion” board into shoes and accessories and want to divide the pins, you will need to repin that pin onto the new board and then go back and delete the pin from the original board. While this process isn’t hard, it isn’t as simple as it could/should be.

Once your boards are set up, now is a great time to open up your Pinterest community. Earlier in the series, I talked about viewing pins through either the EVERYTHING page or your PINNERS YOU FOLLOW page.

The EVERYTHING page is a great place to go if you are just having a general browse; the PINNERS YOU FOLLOW page is the go to place to see what your friends and pinterest community have been pinning lately.

There are various ways to find and add friends on Pinterest. The obvious and easiest way is by linking your facebook profile to your pinterest profile and Pinterest will then do the work for you, giving you a list of your friends on the book who are already on Pinterest  and an invite button for those who aren’t.

You can also invite your friends by using the Invite tool provided by Pinterest, where you can add in email addresses and a personal message. From within this email link, that friend can then click on your profile and “add” you to their list of followers.

When it comes to choosing who you want to follow and what pins you want to simply like, this depends on your strategy and reasons for Pinning. I only follow people I know as I want to keep my community personal, but I know many people who follow someone whose boards/pins continually catch their eye and want to keep up to date with this person and their pins.

The PINNERS YOU FOLLOW page is a great way to see those pins from people you know/have chosen to follow and the EVERYTHING page is a broad representation of what is being pinned on Pinterest at any given time.

How to Guide

Part 3: Pinterest on the World Wide Web

This is the third post in my 5 part series on Pinterest 

1. Getting Started with Pinterest

2. Pinning with Pinterest

3. Pinterest on The World Wide Web

4. Your Pinterest Boards and Community

5. Pinterest as a Search Engine

Once you have gotten used to pinning from within the Pinterest site, you are ready to take your explorations to the World Wide Web/Internet. To do this, you will need to install the Pinterest “Pin It” bookmark tool onto your browser. Luckily, this is VERY easy to do.

 

You will see in the top right hand corner of the window, the ABOUT tab which gives you 6 options; the obvious one here being the Pin It Button. Click on this and you will then be taken to a very easy to read page where Pinterest explains how to install the button, but to sum up in this post:

1. Turn on your bookmarks bar (Ctrl+shift+B)

2. Drag the “Pin It” button on to the bookmarks bar

3. Start Pinning

Installing this button allows you to pin images from your travels across the internet, from any site at any time.

When you see an image you like on a particular webpage, click the Pin It button on your bookmarks bar, and you will be taken to a screen that looks like this:

(The amount of images displayed will depend on the amount of images on that page)

Hover over the image you want to pin, and a pin this symbol will appear. When you click on that pin, you will be shown a pop-up screen very similar to what would appear within the Pinterest site. As in the Pinterest site, you then select which board you would like to place the pin on, make a comment or leave a dash and Pinterest will magically take your pin over to your profile.

So if you are on a fashion site and see an image of a skirt that you love, you can pin it to one of your fashion boards. Or if you see a picture of a delicious meal, you can pin it to your Dinner pin.  This means you can be adding to your boards whenever you see something that catches your eye, without having to go into the Pinterest site.

I find now that I pin more from outside of the Pinterest site and the only time I explore the pins within Pinterest is when I’m checking out those pins from my friends or the boards of those people I follow. In saying that, I do love a good Pinterest session where I can spend hours trawling through the different images people are putting up at any given time and adding to, creating new and developing my boards. Endless creativity.

How to Guide

Part 2: Pinning with Pinterest

This is the second post on my 5 part series on Pinterest 

1. Getting Started with Pinterest

2. Pinning with Pinterest

3. Pinterest on The World Wide Web

4. Your Pinterest Boards and Community

5. Pinterest as a Search Engine

Once you have your boards set up, it is time to go and explore the world of Pinterest.  At the top of the page you will see a tool bar with the following tab options:

These tabs are all pretty self-explanatory. I have found the “Everything” tab is the page I refer to most often for general browsing. I will explain more about following people within Pinterest at a later post.

When you click on the “Everything” tab, you will be taken to a page of recent pins by a random collection of Pinterest users. These “pins” have no set rhyme or reason, they are more just a representation of what people are pinning at any given moment of time.

When you see (and it is definitely a matter of when not if) a pin that you like, click on the pin and you will then be taken to a page with a larger view of that pin. From this page, you will be able to see who originally pinned the image, where the source of image came from (usually a website) and who has pinned the image since the original pin.

In the top left hand corner of the image, you will see the options to either “like” or “repin” the image. If you choose to “like” this image, it will show up in your “likes” page but not on a board. If you choose to “repin” the image, it will then show up on your profile on the selected board where your community will be able to view your pin.

When you choose the “repin” option, you will be asked to select a board to pin the image onto. Selecting the board is easy as you are given a drop down menu of all the boards you have.

Once you have selected your board, you will then be asked to leave a comment. This is the only part about Pinterest that I’m not a fan of as you HAVE to leave a comment or a text line in the box or it won’t let you pin the image.

Sometimes, there is definitely something you will want to say about an image, e.g. Delicious, LOVE the colour, want for my collection, a great present idea etc but other times there isn’t anything you want to say. They way I have found to get around this is to just leave a full stop or a back slash (or any punctuation) in comments box.

After repining, you will be taken back to the screen of the original image, where you can either use your browser “back” button to get to the search page or you can use the tab options at the top of the screen.

NB: you don’t have to go into a larger version of a pin to repin or like it – each pin, no matter where it is, will have the “repin” or “like” tabs in their top left corner, making it super easy to repin an image that has caught your eye.

From this point, you are pretty much set with pinning from within the Pinterest site. Every time you hit refresh, new pins will have been added, so the inspiration pinning possibilities are endless.

Part 3: Pinterest on the World Wide Web

How to Guide

Part 1: Getting Started with Pinterest

There is quite a bit of buzz out there at the moment about this site called Pinterest (and with good reason) and I have found the most common question regarding the site is “what is it?”

This is the first post on my 5 part series on Pinterest 

1. Getting Started with Pinterest

2. Pinning with Pinterest

3. Pinterest on The World Wide Web

4. Your Pinterest Boards and Community

5. Pinterest as a Search Engine

Pinterest is an online visual board website; you create a board and then in your travels around the internet you “pin” images to this board. Remember when you were a teenager and you would spend hours cutting out magazine pictures that you L.O.V.E.D and sticking them onto a piece of card? This is that but with a technological twist, aka The Internet.

This is a very general summarisation about what it is and how it works, so much like I did with my Polyvore series, I’m here to talk you through getting started with Pinterest and making the most of this AMAZING site.

First up, you will need to sign up to Pinterest and to do this, you will need an invite. The reason for this is mostly to help with an overload of users (ensuring the site stays fast for you) but also to help build some hype around getting started. (If you would like an invite but don’t know anyone on the site yet, leave a comment and your email address and I’ll be happy to invite you in.)

Once you have received your invite, you can either sign up as a brand new user or you can link it to your facebook or twitter account. The beauty with signing up using Facebook is that Pinterest can (if you choose) go and find your Facebook friends who are already Pinterest users, making it super easy to connect with people and extend your Pinterest community.

Once you have signed up, the first thing I would advise you do is to set up your profile.When you first log in, you are given 5 default boards.

Now obviously you can keep these boards if you wish, but they are pretty general in nature so you might like to change them to topics that better suit your personality.

For example, when I first went in, after having a browse through some of the pins out there, I knew I would need boards using the following themes:

1. A food board

2. A fashion board

3. A travel board

4. A book board

5. A ‘decorating tips’ board

There is no limitation on the amount of boards you can have, but as you get the hang of browsing and pinning, I would start off small and then as you develop your Pinterest flair, either add boards or start splitting some of your current boards into more specific topics. (I divided my “fashion” board into Look Book, Wardrobe Wonderland, In Her Shoes, Closet Coveting, In My Wardrobe and am still finding ways to split these up).

Once you have your boards set up, it is time to go and explore the world of Pinterest. Stay tuned for Part 2 of my series where I talk you through pinning images to your boards.

Part 2: Pinning with Pinterest

How to Guide

Part 5: Getting Social With Polyvore

This is the fifth post in my 5-part series on Polyvore.

1. Getting Started with Polyvore

2. Getting Up and Running with Polyvore

3. Getting Stylish and Creative with Polyvore

4. Using Pinterest with Polyvore

5. Getting Social with Polyvore

Once you have learned how to create and publish sets (and perhaps even collections) within the Polyvore website, the next step is to share your creations and then to find other users whose creations you like and follow them.

You will see at the top of the Polyvore home page a tool bar that looks like this:

  • There is the TOP page for those creations that were standout on a particular day in the Polyvore community
  • The FOLLOWING page where the sets of the people you follow are presented
  • The  page where likes are displayed from the people you follow
  • The ASK page where you can ask and answer questions from other peeps on Polyvore
  • The SHOP page where you can obviously shop for items that you have spied in your travels
  • The CREATE page where you work your magic through set and collection creations

Much like other social networking sites, Polyvore allows you to interact with other users on the site through ‘liking’ a set, making comments and sending private messages to a user. There is also the option of following someone, either directly on the site (and they will then appear on your FOLLOWING page) or using “RSS Feed” which means that when that person creates and publishes something new, you will be notified by email. Genius!

Polyvore have made it delightfully easy to find and follow other people in the community; whether it is for a specific item/set, a celeb style interpretation or a presentation idea. When you click on the FOLLOWING and  page, you will see sets from your favourites displayed but you will also see a Recommended Members to Follow link which allows you to continue to explore other Polyvore users, based upon people you already like.

The sheer amount of users and creations per day on the site can make it somewhat overwhelming at times; so the easy to navigate pages make it fun and easy to find and follow new people whenever you are looking for new inspiration.

How to Guide

Part 4: Using Pinterest with Polyvore

This is the fourth post in my 5-part series on Polyvore.

1. Getting Started with Polyvore

2. Getting Up and Running with Polyvore

3. Getting Stylish and Creative with Polyvore

4. Using Pinterest with Polyvore

5. Getting Social with Polyvore

If you have heard of Polyvore, (and have been following my “how to” series) then no doubt you have heard of Pinterest and have an equal addiction to both. If you haven’t heard of Pinterest, basically it is a website where you get to create your own visual boards using images from the internet. It’s like the boards we used to make when we were kids, cutting pictures out of magazines and sticking them onto card but the 20th century version on the internet. Amazing.

I have found through my adventures on Polyvore that I turn to Pinterest more and more – for inspiration for looks, for background images, for theme ideas and for new blogs to follow. The two websites are super easy to use in their own right but marry oh so well with their user-friendly clipper tools, making it easy to swap images between sites.

There are many ways to maximise the use of the two websites but I mainly use Pinterest with Polyvore for set inspiration; for presentation options with a set and to share my sets on a platform other than Polyvore.

Using Pinterest images for inspiration

One of my favourite ways to make a set is to bring across an image of an outfit I have found on Pinterest, add it to my Polyvore canvas and then go and find items of clothing that are similar to those in the inspiration pic (but with my personal take on it).

Falling into Fall

Adding the image is as easy as using your clipper tool, where it will then be sent to your “items” in your Polyvore. You can then either use the search options in Polyvore or spread your search wider to the internet to find the items that you would pair with that look.

Having the picture is good for outfit inspiration but is also a nice way to add an element of interest to the presentation of a set.

Using Pinterest images as background images.

If I am creating a set that has a theme, for example a summer theme, Pinterest is the perfect place to find images to compliment and accompany the clothing items I have selected. Whether the image is the main visual aspect of the set or merely hiding in the background, the range of images on Pinterest means you have an endless supply of presentation options for your Polyvore set.

Casual yet Cool

(fall photo from Pinterest, bicycle pic also from Pinterest)

(“Cloning” and “flipping” a picture of some boats to compliment a summer themed set)

Using Pinterest to present my sets.

I have a board on Pinterest called The Worlds Wardrobe. Once I have created a set and have published it onto my Polyvore profile, I like to then “pin” the published set over on my board for Pinterest peeps to check out. Using the “Pin It” bookmark on my bookmarks bar and following the pop-up screens, it is as easy as the click of a mouse button to share my sets.

You will also a notice a handy little “Facebook” box that you can check if you are linked between facebook and Pinterest – another platform for sharing your creations.

It’s a great way to share the cookie love with my friends on Pinterest but also to show off my creations to a wider audience that may not know me on Polyvore. Some of the sets on Polyvore have been featured in my blog posts and others are sets I made up just for fun.

As you get to know both of these amazing websites better, you will find that you naturally start to use them together more and more. Whether it is for inspiration or presentation, these two websites compliment each other perfectly and are oh so easy to use, making them your “go to” place for your wardrobe planning, creating and dreaming.

Stay tuned for the final part in my “Getting Starting with Polyvore” series where I talk about how to leverage Polyvore as a social networking tool.

How to Guide

Part 3: Getting Stylish and Creative with Polyvore

This is the third post in my 5-part series on Polyvore.

1. Getting Started with Polyvore

2. Getting Up and Running with Polyvore

3. Getting Stylish and Creative with Polyvore

4. Using Pinterest with Polyvore

5. Getting Social with Polyvore

So you are now up and running with Polyvore; you can search and find images within the Polyvore options and you can also bring in items that you have found around the internet. The next natural progression is to look at your presentation, exploring the different options given within the Polyvore dashboard.

I’m by no means an expert when it comes to presentation – I have a tendency to go for a more minimal look with my sets – but I have picked up some tips and tricks along the way that I’m going to share with y’all which will open up your options when deciding on how you want to present a set.

You will see within the Polyvore dashboard the Embellishments section – this is the go to place for adding backgrounds, texts etc to your set – there are ten different types of embellishments, so you are pretty well covered depending on how you want your set to look.

The great thing here is that if you don’t like any of the options given, the clipper you added from the last part of the series is going to come into play. The clipper isn’t limited to just clothing items, you can use it to add any image you like, as long as it is compatible with Polyvore. (Remember some images have a bit of *flash* about them which makes them unrecognisable to Polyvore). So if you see a photo, a book cover, a wallpaper pattern that you like, you can add it to your Polyvore items for use in the presentation of you next Polyvore creation.

(Images/ideas I have added to my Polyvore for future use)

For example, I was recently looking at a “how to guide” on making a canvas with fairy lights. I liked the image they had given so I clipped it to my Polyvore, thinking it would look great in a “date night” set or a “garden party” set.

The Background options given by Polyvore are wide and varied, but searching through them isn’t the easiest as the search bar doesn’t allow you to specify a topic within the backgrounds collection. So once you are in there, the only way to search is to go through each page until you find something you like (or to search by colour but even then, you still have to go through each page until you find what you are looking for)

I have found a way around this search limitation by using search bars on other websites (for example Pinterest) and then clipping these images from around the internet using my handy dandy clipper tool.

The other day I was putting together a summer look for a post I was writing and wanted some summery images for the presentation of my set. After having a browse through the Background images and not seeing anything I liked, I headed over to Pinterest (my other favourite internet hobby/time waster) and used their search tool for “summer”. Once I found the image I wanted, I used the clipper to add it to my items where I was then able to insert it into my set. Easy.

A very popular presentation technique on Polyvore is to add an image from the Magazine Articles section of Embellishments – this is a nice way to present a set as if you were a magazine editor and is a great way to get noticed on Polyvore (I have noticed that most sets “featured” on Polyvore have a ‘magazine shoot’ look about them).

 http://theacademic.polyvore.com/

The Text section is a great way to name or add quotes to a set and there are a few options in the Frame section which work well with a ‘favourite type of’ or ‘look book’ type set. These two sections are worth exploring as they are an easy but effective embellishment to your presentation.

These are just a few of the more common embellishments that I use in my Polyvore creations. As you gain confidence and get to know the dashboard, the options for presentation become endless. Depending on the type of set you are creating and the story you want to tell, with the clipper tool, your options embellishing and enhancing your set are numerous. Your only limit is your imagination (and perhaps your internet ‘savvyness’).

Stay tuned for part 4 of my 5 part “Getting started with Polyvore” series where I’m going to go into more depth about Pinterest to Polyvore for inspiration and use in your sets.

Part 4: Using Pinterest with Polyvore